Visualize the Directory Tree

Ever have to work with a new directory and you have no idea what its structure is? Or maybe you have a few files laying around but you’re not sure which sub-directory they are in? Or maybe you’re showing someone else a project and you want to show them the directory hierarchy. The bare bones solutions of `ls -R` or `find .` are just too archaic and offer no visualization of the structure. To solve this problem, people have built their own “tree” scripts.

There are a few tree scripts available online. Some as simple as find | sed and others are slightly more advanced like a python script. I wasn’t pleased with the existing solutions, so I wrote my own. To get an idea of what I’m talking about take a look at this screenshot showing the listing of a Rails project:

tree

Its a simple, clean listing of the directory tree. I will admit, the style is based off of another tree script that I’ve seen that I liked. Also, this isn’t really production quality code. I take the lazy way out and first get a directory listing and then work from there. This means that for large directories there may be an initial pause before it starts outputting. I wouldn’t suggest running this on your home directory. Although I can think of better algorithms its unlikely that I would want to run this on huge directories so I’m more then happy right now.

The usage is pretty bare bones:

tree usage

This is one more script I’ve added to my ~/bin and its completely open source on GitHub. Its just straight Ruby, no extra packages, works with 1.8 and 1.9. Oh and did I mention its customizable?

I hope you like it.

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